End of Life Issues

“To live in a manner worthy of our human dignity, and to spend our final days on this earth in peace and comfort, surrounded by loved ones—that is the hope of each of us. In particular, Christian hope sees these final days as a time to prepare for our eternal destiny. Today, however, many people fear the dying process. They are afraid of being kept alive past life’s natural limits by burdensome medical technology. They fear experiencing intolerable pain and suffering, losing control over bodily functions, or lingering with severe dementia. They worry about being abandoned or becoming a burden on others.

Our society can be judged by how we respond to these fears. A caring community devotes more attention, not less, to members facing the most vulnerable times in their lives. When people are tempted to see their own lives as diminished in value or meaning, they most need the love and assistance of others to assure them of their inherent worth. The healing art of medicine is an important part of this assistance. Even when a cure is not possible, medicine plays a critical role in providing “palliative care”—alleviating pain and other symptoms and meeting basic needs. Such care should combine medical skill with attention to the emotional as well as spiritual needs of those facing the end of life. ” (From the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops www.usccb.org)

Steven Bozza, the Director of the Respect Life Office, Archdiocese of Philadelphia, has given permission for us to view his power point on the website:  To the End of Our Days

Please check these other resources:

AdvanceHealthCareDirectives

bishops-statement-physician-assisted-suicide-to-live-each-day

This attachment from the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference is a Combined Living Will and Health Care Power of Attorney —  PCC .